From Bland to Bold – At Home with Pine State Biscuits

by Leah Nash on 10/17/2014

Spent a day with Kevin Atchley, co-owner of Portland’s Pine State Biscuits and his lovely gal Laleña Dolby, communications director at Zenger Farm, photographing their adorable pad for Oregon Home Magazine.  At only 690-square-foot the duo worked wonders making the place magazine worthy (literally).  Think reclaimed wood and thrift stores finds plus a knack for putting pieces together in a way that is both beautiful and original (now why didn’t I think of that…).  We finished off the day with a little bourbon and gossip and voila, we now feel lucky to call the couple friends.

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Portland Corporate Portrait – Lawyer Robert S. Banks Jr. for the NYT’s

by Leah Nash on 09/25/2014

Popped over to the Banks Law Office to photograph Robert S. Banks for a New York Times article.  Robert was a great guy, and even thought to bring a prop to the shoot (his tres chic Coach brief case).  The tone of the article was pretty serious (his client unsuccessfully opposed the removal of her complaint against her former broker whose regulatory file included 41 customer complaints and a job termination!) and so we needed his vibe to match.  Luckily, he seemed to have the tough lawyer look down.

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Writing His Own Script – Literally

by Leah Nash on 09/09/2014

We recently photographed Portland investor Stan Rosenfeld for Charles Schwab’s high end investor magazine Onward. Stan is amazing, he still does everything the old fashioned way, with pen and paper.

For the shoot we purchased a large piece of 1/8 inch clear plastic and hung it with C-stands inside the studio to get the handwritten “script” for the story headline. We opted to do this in camera, rather than in post to make it look more authentic.  We redid it so many times I felt like I was back in cursive writing class.  We also had Stan write some equations and stock lingo on the board to fill in the negative space and give it a bit more personality.  No stock tips though…..

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Portland Urban Wineries for the NYT’s

by Leah Nash on 08/28/2014

Somewhere along the line I have become the de facto, “Portland food, lifestyle and travel” photographer for the New York Times.  And if you’ve read the NYT lately, you realize that is a job that keeps me rather busy.  People in Portland now joke about it, when I mention who I’m working for, “Oh, man, they are doing another story about us?” is the response I get.  And I understand that.  Sometimes I feel that living the good life Portland is a secret I’d rather not share.  Unfortunately, I think the cat may be out of the bag.  Damn you, Fred and Carrie.

Below are some outtakes from a recent Urban Wineries shoot I did for the paper which included stalking the tannin soaked halls of the Southeast Wine CollectiveClay Pigeon WineryENSO Urban Winery and Tasting Lounge, and Sauvage at Fausse Piste.  Gotta love that urban terroir.

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Earth, Wind and Fire – Traveling to Idaho for The New York Times

by Leah Nash on 08/15/2014

Did you know Idaho was a hot destination spot?  Me neither, but clearly the New York TimesArnold Schwarzenegger and Ernest Hemingway beg to differ.  Challenged with shooting a travel story on wildfires, we hopped a plane, rented a car with a sunroof (always a sunroof) and started cruising.  We hit the “Highway to Heaven” trail, also known as Highway 21, where areas are still scarred by lightning storms which ignited 335 fires in the Boise National Forest over the course of eight days in 1989, eventually burning 46,000 acres of land.  Now new growth mixes with burned remains, creating a visual mosaic. We hit places with backcountry names like Beaver Creek and Big Woods River which we off-roaded through at Sunset, trying to avoid gangs of Elk.  Then after days with no cell reception we touched down in Sun Valley, an oasis that housed Hemingway through the last of his years and now provides skiing, tennis, chocolate shops, and outdoor ice skating to the world weary. But the luxury seemed suspect after days of rolling in black forest fire ash, and once we showered off and imbibed a cocktail or two, we were back on the road.  Next stop was The Wrangler Drive-In to suck down blackberry milkshakes and gape at the Jackalope, a burger not for the timid which weighs in at 2 pounds.  Completing our Idaho loop we paused at The Silver Creek Preserve to quietly stalk the fly fisherman as they did a little stalking of their own, both of us trying not to disturb our prey.  From there it was a straight shot to Boise with the music cranked and the sunroof open as we both admired our tans and picked the tall grass out of our socks.

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Pickathon 2014

by Leah Nash on 08/05/2014

Spent the first weekend of August how we always do, photographing the amazingness that is Pickathon, a four-day music festival located on the 80-acre Pendarvis farm in Happy Valley, just about 30 minutes outside of Portland. Now in its 16th year with six, count them…six, different music venues, the festival focuses on sustainability and the best part is they have eliminated single use cups, bottles, dishes and utensils and been plastic free since 2010!

This year, the New York Times decided to stop by and get in on the West Coast love and being so gracious, we decided to join them.

Ate some great food, did a little dancing, saw more incredible acts then we could mention, though here is a feeble attempt….The SadiesNickel CreekMac DeMarcoDiarrhea PlanetPossessed By Paul JamesValerie JuneThe War On DrugsBlind Pilot and even managed to take a photo or two.

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Trust For Public Land

by Leah Nash on 07/09/2014

Had the opportunity to photograph for The Trust for Public Land this year.  TPL is a U.S. national, nonprofit organization that conserves land for people to enjoy as parks, gardens, natural areas and open space. And who doesn’t think that is pretty awesome?  We were tasked with documenting Colwood Park, a golf course that it reinventing itself, and Nadaka Nature Park, a former Camp Fire Girl spot.  So we gathered a group of intrepid volunteers and let them run free, literally.

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Seaside Oregon is Cooler Than You Remember

by Leah Nash on 06/30/2014

If you had asked me two months ago what my thoughts were about Seaside, OR the three words that would have come to mind were….bumper cars, salt water taffy, and tacky.  Well, turns out only two of those were right.  Was there photographing for 1859 Magazine and I’m not quite sure what happened, but Seaside sure has changed its ways.  Now I’m not saying they have gotten rid of the dreamsicle taffy, the 80-year-old aquarium, or the mechanical great white shark, but the town has a new vibe.  Seaside Brewing Co.has popped up, in, of all places, the old 1914 city jail.  The Promenade is looking rather spiffy and goes for miles.  Maybe it’s the new obsession with all things old, or my love of a gold Trans Am but suddenly tacky is looking rather fab.  Or maybe that’s just the $1 jello shots from Big Kahuna Bar and Grill talking.

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Teacher of the Year, Jeff Charbonneau for Ed Tech Magazine

by Leah Nash on 06/20/2014

Spent the day playing with vials, beakers and all things science for our Cover Shoot for EdTech Magazine with 2013 National Teacher of the year, Jeffrey Charbonneau.  The Science and Engineering teacher graces the halls of Zillah High School, the very same school he graduated from.  Talk about your high school flashbacks.  At least he knows all the good make out spots.  Seriously though, as we roamed the halls with Jeff, he got a greeting or a hug from almost every student we passed.  Coming from a family of teachers, I know they don’t always get their due.  Glad in the case of Jeffrey, someone noticed.

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Portland Timbers’ v. Sounders for the NYTimes Travel Section

by Leah Nash on 05/25/2014

_DX_8628Last fall Christopher Onstott, Jan Sonnenmair and I all banded together to shoot a little NW soccer action for the New York Times Travel Section.  Those Timbers Fans are not messing around.  Many of them slept in line overnight to be the first ones in the stands. Not to mentions the costumes, the Timbers Army, the green smoke and those ubiquitous scarves.  In some ways the fans are way more interesting to watch than the soccer itself (and way more fun to photograph).  The game we shot they ended up beating the Sounders 1 to 0, which means the green smoke was flying.  In a city with not a ton of professional sports options (and the Blazers will break our hearts every time) and not a ton of what I would call your typical sports fan, it is so amazing to see Portland rally around soccer.

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Willamette Week’s 2013 Restaurant Guide

by Leah Nash on 04/10/2014

Love the bounty of good eating that is Portland.  Roe, Catagna, Ava Gene’s are all vying for most buzz in the city these days (case in point, I have photographed all of them at least twice).  But there are a plethora of others out there for those of us that hate waiting in line.  So many choices in fact that it is nice that Willamette Week’s Restaurant Guide helps narrow things down (or maybe simply make you aware of all the possibilities).  Now go forth and chew.

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Farm to Table, Pop-up Restaurant with Will Priesch for Portland Monthly Magazine

by Leah Nash on 04/08/2014

With just 10 stools and a rented kitchen, Will Preisch presents a pop-up vision of high-end eating: casual, personal, and thrilling.  Want to make it to one of these amazing feasts?  Called holdfast dinners, Will describes them as such, “holdfast is a “pop-up” restaurant operating out of kitchencru, a commissary kitchen and culinary incubator in nw portland.  holdfast is a refined dining concept – not refinement in the sense of luxury – just pared down to what we consider to be the essentials of a wonderful meal; great food and drink, with excellent and unobtrusive service in a casual atmosphere. this is our opportunity to cook and feed people outside of the trappings of a traditional restaurant. clean.  thoughtful.  primitive.  modern.”  Looked pretty delightful to me, and Portland Monthly.

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The Addictive Allure of the Steelhead’s Tug – Photos for the New York Times

by Leah Nash on 04/06/2014

Spend a rainy day a few months back chasing down steelhead in the Deschutes River.  My partners were fly fishing devotees, Chris Santella, author of 50 Places to Fly Fish Before you Die (guess I can cross one of them off my list) and environmental lawyer Dave Moskowitz, the Executive Director for the Deschutes River Alliance.  These gentlemen spend 40 to 50 days on the river each season, knee deep in the rushing water, waiting for the fish to get irritated enough to make their move.  For steelhead rarely feed once they are in the river, rather they seem to take a fly as an act of aggression. Even if they are present where you are fishing, they have to be in the mood (presumably, a bad mood) to bite.  For these reasons days will sometimes pass with not a single acknowledgement of even their presence, making their elusivity all the more attractive to those that seek a challenge.  This was much of the case on our day in the water, broken up by beer and a variety of fish tales from both men.  As the sky grew dark, and I grew cold, Chris got the solitary respite of the day, a sharp tug on his line. He lifted his rod, exactly the wrong thing to do, and the fish was gone, never even seen.  As we headed home, both men planned their next trip out.  For myself, thwarted from even a single glimpse during an assignment where that was the only goal, I declined, and tried not to curse the fish.  You can read the full story of our adventures, here in the New York Times.

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Pulling Back the Clouds for Grand Coulee

by Leah Nash on 03/22/2014

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Spent four gray days in Grand Coulee waiting for the clouds to part.  If you are a lover of dams and amazing feats of concrete, then I highly recommend the trip.  However, I would say go in summer, when the place might actually be open and they put on (or so I was told, having not seen it myself) a laser light show!  I got the call around early November and so saw mostly rain and shops that said ‘closed.’  The story was for the New York Times travel section, all about Wood Guthrie.  At the time I didn’t realize that his Columbia River Collection, which contains many of his most well known tunes, including ‘Grand Coulee Dam,’ was actually commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration as propaganda!  So he and I were both creative types working for the man when we made the trip to the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World.’  Him to write songs and me to document the town and his memory, immortalized in a rather off putting statue.

Cruised the town, making friends and crashing pancake breakfasts and finally, on the fourth day, the clouds parted and the light got nice and somewhere, Woody Guthrie chuckled a bit at both of us.20131109_Guthrie_024 20131110_Guthrie_084

The Visually Impaired get hands on with a Tiger

by Leah Nash on 03/02/2014

Did a fascinating and crazy story awhile back for the Wall Street Journal about the Oregon Zoo.  In seems the zoo anesthetizes its tigers every few years to do check ups.  Well someone had the idea to add a bunch of visually impaired children to this scenario.  I can just imagine the conversation where someone pitches this idea.  But somebody pitched and somebody agreed and the result was both amazing and surreal.  Swarms of people touching the paws, whiskers, even the tongue, of a 235-pound Siberian named Nikki.  Meanwhile the big cat is being shaved, having blood drawn, getting its temperature taken (and yes, you are correct about where the thermometer was placed).  Really a once in a lifetime experience not only for the children, but for myself.  Oh, and the tiger.20130716_Blind_036 20130716_Blind_066 20130716_Blind_043 20130716_Blind_044 20130716_Blind_049 20130716_Blind_052 20130716_Blind_059 20130716_Blind_062 20130716_Blind_064 20130716_Blind_042